Blog Archives

Performance: yes, it’s worth looking at the small stuff

While I was in New York for QCon last week, the temperatures started out quite mild, but soared back to their usual sweltering summertime levels by midweek. I thus found myself confined to my hotel room for a few hours
Posted in haskell

(re)announcing statprof, a statistical profiler for Python

Back in 2005, Andy Wingo wrote a neat little statistical profiler named statprof that promptly disappeared into obscurity. It has since languished almost unknown, with a handful of people writing semi-private forks that themselves seem to be dead. Statistical profiling
Posted in open source, python

github is making me feel stupid(er)

I’m approaching my fourth anniversary of using github. I should hardly have to state that it’s a wonderful service, and especially so for being kept freely available to the open source community. At the same time, I’ve noticed over the
Posted in Uncategorized

aeson 0.4: easier, faster, better

After months of work, and a number of great contributions from other developers, I just released version 0.4 of aeson, the de facto standard Haskell JSON library. This is a major release, with a number of improvements. Enjoy! Ease of
Posted in haskell, open source

The future of MailRank’s open source technologies

(Cross-posted from the MailRank engineering blog.) You may have seen my exciting news about our upcoming move to Facebook. It’s been a total blast working on our product, and of course as we did so we released a number of
Posted in haskell, open source

A major new release of the Haskell statistics library

I'm pleased to announce a major release of of the Haskell statistics library, version 0.10.0.0. I'd particularly like to thank Alexey Khudyakov for his wonderful work on this release. New features: Student-T, Fisher-Snedecor, F-distribution, and Cauchy-Lorentz distributions are added. Histogram
Posted in haskell, open source

The Strange Loop conference was a blast

Last week, I flew to St Louis for the excellent Strange Loop conference, where I gave a 3-hour Haskell tutorial and a talk on how we use Haskell at my startup company, MailRank. Strange Loop is a pretty good approximation
Posted in haskell, open source

Fitter, happier, more productive UTF-8 decoding

The other night, I had a random whim to spend a couple of minutes looking at the performance of UTF-8 decoding in the Haskell Unicode text package. Actually, rather than look at the actual performance, what I did was use
Posted in haskell, open source

Here be dragons: advances in problems you didn’t even know you had

Here’s something I bet you never think about, and for good reason: how are floating-point numbers rendered as text strings? This is a surprisingly tough problem, but it’s been regarded as essentially solved since about 1990.Prior to Steele and White’s
Posted in haskell, open source, Uncategorized

attoparsec 0.9, a major (and abortive) release [updated]

Update: I just released attoparsec 0.9.1.0, which undoes all of the changes described below. The problem? While removing backtracking, I accidentally changed the semantics of the <|> operator in an unforeseen and unfortunate way. The bug I introduced was that
Posted in haskell